SARS–a definition and history of the virus from Encyclopedia Britannica (Britannica Online)

SARS, in full severe acute respiratory syndrome, highly contagious respiratory illness characterized by a persistent fever, headache, and bodily discomfort, followed by a dry cough that may progress to great difficulty in breathing. SARS appeared in November 2002 in Guangdong province, China, where it was first diagnosed as an atypical pneumonia.  . . . SARS is caused by a coronavirus, a type of virus usually associated with pneumonia and the common cold.   Read the entire article from Britannica online here.

US Senate Chaplain Peter Marshall

2016-05-27

Peter_MarshallAmerican Minute with Bill Federer Link to original article

Twentieth-Century Fox made a motion picture in 1955 titled A Man Called Peter, about the life of U.S. Senate Chaplain Peter Marshall, born MAY 27, 1902.

After World War II ended and as the Korean War began, the U.S. Senate appointed Peter Marshall to be their Chaplain on January 4, 1947.

Peter Marshall prayed:

“O Lord our God, even at this moment as we come blundering into Thy presence in prayer, we are haunted by memories of duties unperformed, promptings disobeyed, and beckonings ignored.

Opportunities to be kind knocked on the door of our hearts and went weeping away.”

 

On January 13, 1947, U.S. Senate Chaplain Peter Marshall stated:

“The choice before us is plain: Christ or chaos, conviction or compromise, discipline or disintegration.

I am rather tired of hearing about our rights… The time is come to hear about responsibilities…

America’s future depends upon her accepting and demonstrating God’s government.”

 

Just 6 months before he died, June 11, 1948, U.S. Senate Chaplain Peter Marshall opened Congress with the prayer:

“Help us, our Father, to show other nations an America to imitate… the America that loves fair play, honest dealing, straight talk, real freedom and faith in God.”

Liturgical Colors

Liturgical Colors

“Liturgical Colors” in Episcopal worship signify our place in the Church Year:

WHITE, the color of Jesus’ burial garments, for Christmas, Easter, and other ‘feasts’ or festival days, as well as marriages and funerals.

PURPLE/VIOLET for Advent (or ROYAL BLUE) & Lent (or UNBLEACHED LINEN).

RED is used in Holy Week, the Day of Pentecost, and at ordinations.

GREEN is used during Epiphany and the ‘Ordinary Time’ after Pentecost Sunday.

Find the website here that explains the liturgical colors.

MORE Christmas music

This is by The Piano Guys — the world’s best music group. SILENT NIGHT
The Piano Guys O COME O COME EMMANUEL
The Piano Guys AWAY IN A MANGER
George Winston — the world’s best piano soloist CAROL OF THE BELLS
The Piano Guys ANGELS WE HAVE HEARD ON HIGH
The Piano Guys GOOD KING WENCELAS
The Piano Guys STILL STILL STILL

From Where Does the Revised Common Lectionary (RCL) Originate?

[I found this article on the Vanderbilt website.]

The Revised Common Lectionary, first published in 1992, derives from The Common Lectionary of 1983, both based on the Ordo Lectionem Missae of 1969, a post-Vatican II ground-breaking revision of the Roman Lectionary. “The post-Vatican II Roman Lectionary represented a profound break with the past. Not only were the readings organized according to a plan whereby a richer fare of scripture was read in liturgical celebrations, in contrast to the medieval lectionary where the choice of readings was simply helter-skelter, but for the first time in history the Sunday lectionary covered a period of three years, each year being dedicated to a particular synoptic author–Matthew, Mark, or Luke. A fourth year was not dedicated to the gospel of John because readings from this gospel permeate the sacred seasons, especially the latter part of Lent and most of Easter.”

(from The Roman Lectionary and the Scriptures Read in Church, by Frank C. Quinn. National Catholic Reporter, Volume 31, no. 5 (November 18 1994), p. 6)

A remarkable statistic about Birds

 From Cornell University Bird Lab
If you were alive in 1970, 29% of breeding birds in the U.S. and Canada have disappeared within your lifetime. These data signal an urgent need to repair the very fabric of our ecosystems — and bring birds back.

Habitat loss and degradation are the biggest reasons for the rapid and staggering loss of birds across the continent. What are other leading causes of bird deaths because of humans? Every year, more than 2.6 billion birds are estimated to be killed by cats, and up to 1 billion birds are killed by window strikes in the U.S. and Canada alone. Collisions with vehicles and structures such as power lines and communications towers are additionally estimated to kill more than 300 million.